What does whatever mean?

10 important German idioms you need to know

For many, the German language is still “a book with seven seals”, a mystery. It sounds harsh, seems impossible to learn and has absurdly long words ("Danube steamship company captain”Is my personal favorite). Even if German is not one of the most widely spoken languages ​​in the world, it has almost 100 million native speakers, plus another 100 million whose second or third language is German. In addition, I would say that it is one of the most expressive languages ​​there is - to prove it, today I am introducing you to these strange expressions.

1. "That's my sausage"

In English this literally means: "This is sausage to me"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? This expression is used when you are indifferent to something or have no opinion about something. Germans often answer with this idiom - when someone asks you: "What would you like to do today? ” (What would you like to do today?) And you don't care, then you can simply answer the following: "It does not matter to me!”Would you like to sound even more authentic? Make of the word "Wurst "just"Doesn't matter”- because that's how the sausage is pronounced in southern Germany.

2. “Only understand train station”

The literal translation into English would be: "To only understand train station"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? If someone tells you: "I only understand train station“(I only understand train station), then that means that they have no idea what you are talking about. You either have to explain it to him again or change the subject right away. The English equivalent would be “It's all Greek to me”.

3. "Cross your fingers for someone"

The literal translation into English would be: "To press your thumbs for someone"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? In Germany this phrase is used to wish someone the best of luck. Often times, the speaker will raise their fists and show you that they are actually crossing their fingers. So if you want to wish someone luck, then you correctly say: "I'll cross my fingers for you! ” or in English: “I'll keep my fingers crossed for you”.

4. "I think my pig whistles"

The literal translation into English would be: "I think my pig whistles"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? Don't think now that we've gone totally insane; we know, of course, that the idea of ​​a whistling pig is totally ridiculous. And that's where the expression comes from, because a whistling pig would be so silly that nobody would believe that it actually exists anyway. Germans use this expression when they cannot believe or grasp something, or to express that they are extremely surprised. In English, the phrase “I think a horse is kicking me” probably comes closest to the matter.

5. "I think I'm crazy"

The literal translation into English would be: "I believe I spider"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? Germans love metaphors - especially those that use an animal. In this case, however, the actual origin of the expression is questionable, which the word "spider”Could also simply use the verb“be crazy”Like Sleeping Beauty on the spinning wheel. In any case, this idiom is used everywhere in Germany to express surprise (whether positive or negative) or to say that a situation or fact can hardly be grasped. A comparable expression in English would be: "I think I'm going crazy".

6. "Fix and be done"

The literal translation into English would be: "To be fixed and finished"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? This is the normal way of saying that you are completely exhausted. In English one would say something like: “I am completely knackered” or “I am all wiped out”. If you want to use this expression correctly, you say: "I'm ready and done! ” Alternatively, you can sigh: "I am fix and all"- where the word"all”Here means“ empty ”.

7. "Well?"

The literal translation into English would be: "What's up?"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? It is not that easy to start a conversation with a German, but if you know someone very well, you can just ask a questioning "N / A? ” begin and the person will respond to it. N / A is probably one of the most efficient ways, at the same time “hello” and “how are you?” accept. If you want to express yourself a little more clearly, you can N / A add a short question, for example: "N / A, alles good? ” (How are you? Everything okay?) Or "So what are you doing? ” (What are you doing? What's cooking?).

8. "Bock"

The literal translation into English would be: "To have a goat"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? This expression comes from the old Rotwelschen word for "hunger”- because it was called“ bokh ”in Rotwelsch. It is most often used to say that you are in the mood for something or that you have absolutely no desire for a certain activity.

"I'm really up for beer" (I'm totally up for a beer)

"I'm not in the mood for the cinema!" (I have zero interest in going to the cinema!)

If you want to ask people if they want to do something, you can also formulate the whole thing as a question: “We're going to eat something. Are you up for?" (We are eating out. Wanna come?)

9. "Somebody's pissing off"

The literal translation into English would be: "To go on someone’s cookie"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? Believe it or not, this phrase has absolutely nothing to do with cookies (which is a shame). It expresses that someone is getting on your nerves. Most often you can hear someone shouting: "You are annoying! ” - This means that the person is annoyed by his counterpart, or (see No. 10) is fed up with him.

10. "Fed up"

The literal translation into English would be: "To have the nose full"

What does the term mean and how do you use it? Here we just have a creative twist on “enough is enough”. The term is often used when someone is fed up with a situation and doesn't want to talk about it anymore. For example, if you really can't hear your neighbour's loud music anymore, you say: "I'm fed up with the loud music! ” (I am fed up with the loud music.) Often you may also hear the variant: "I'm fed up! ” - there the word "nose"(Nose) then through the less polite expletive"snout”(Snout) replaced.

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