Why are ROM-BIOS chips so expensive

firmly soldered BIOS chips - what drives manufacturers to do this?

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I have to vent my anger a little.

In the past two weeks I have lost two mainboards each with a BIOS flash. Not that I am aware of any guilt - the flash routines each ran without an error message, the flash procedure ended successfully in each case. However, both boards have not booted since then.

Incidentally, the flashed BIOS versions are the latest official versions for the boards, so no beta or anything like that.

That something goes wrong with Flash is still understandable. What I don't understand, however, is the fact that more and more boards are being equipped with firmly soldered BIOS chips - a hotflash will therefore initially fall flat. Rescuing the board is almost impossible. The only option: Throw away the board - in this case it is ~ 250 euros.

I don't understand manufacturers' policies on this point. Because I hardly think that one bothered to solder out and replace the BIOS chips with returned boards. Instead, I assume that you will replace the entire board - which in total should be significantly more expensive than the few cents that you save when you do without a socketed BIOS chip.

Basically, I have never liked soldered chips, but at the moment I am even developing a real antiphathy to it.

What do you think about soldered chips?