Which countries did Vespasian conquer?

The fallen eagle / Vespasian vol. 4

from fight to fight

Book opinion on Robert Fabbri - Vespasian: The fallen eagle

"Vespasian: The Fallen Eagle" is a historical novel by Robert Fabbri, which was published in 2019 by Rowohlt Taschenbuch in a translation by Anja Schünemann. The title of the English original edition is "Rome‘s fallen Eagle" and was published in 2013. This is the fourth volume about Vespasian. The unabridged audio book was published by Audiobuch Verlag in 2019 and will be read by Erich Wittenberg.

About the author:
Robert Fabbri, born in 1961, lives in London and Berlin. After completing his studies at the University of London, he worked as an assistant director for 25 years and was involved in films as diverse as “The Hour of the Patriots”, “Hellraiser”, “Hornblower” and “Billy Elliot - I Will ... more

from fight to fight

Book opinion on Robert Fabbri - Vespasian: The fallen eagle

"Vespasian: The Fallen Eagle" is a historical novel by Robert Fabbri, which was published in 2019 by Rowohlt Taschenbuch in a translation by Anja Schünemann. The title of the English original edition is "Rome‘s fallen Eagle" and was published in 2013. This is the fourth volume about Vespasian. The unabridged audio book was published by Audiobuch Verlag in 2019 and will be read by Erich Wittenberg.

About the author:
Robert Fabbri, born in 1961, lives in London and Berlin. After completing his studies at the University of London, he worked as an assistant director for 25 years and was involved in films as diverse as “The Hour of the Patriots”, “Hellraiser”, “Hornblower” and “Billy Elliot - I Will Dance”. Passionate about ancient history, he painted 3,500 Macedonian, Thracian, Galatian, Roman and many other tin soldiers - and eventually began to write. Robert Fabbri became a bestselling author in Great Britain with his epic historical novel series "Vespasian" about the life of the Roman emperor.

Blurb:
In AD 41: Caligula finds his just death. Now Claudius is the new emperor of Rome - but the clumsy ruler needs a presentable success. Vespasian and his brother Sabinus are supposed to bring the fallen eagle of Legio XVII back to Rome, which was lost in Varus' disastrous defeat in the forests of Germania. With the help of this trophy, Claudius wants to invade Britain. The brothers have no choice, they take the scent ...

My opinion:
Caligula's reign of terror is ended by a conspiracy. Claudius is officially his successor, but in fact his three freedmen rule, but they compete with each other and prove to be experienced schemers. Vespasian and his brother have no choice but to lead an expedition to retrieve the fallen eagle. The author describes the battle scenes clearly and with great attention to detail, and Vespasian barely escapes death several times. The brisk quotes from Magnus, whose comments I liked very much, serve to loosen up these tough fight scenes. Vespasian fights tirelessly, but he is only a plaything of the mighty. Then it goes to Britain and there, too, there is mainly fighting. The gruesome portrayal reaches new heights, but a development can be felt with Vespasian. He begins to anticipate developments and experience them more consciously. Furthermore, he often acts without regard to his own health and performs ludicrous deeds. The reader learns a lot about the Roman warfare, but also about how the defeated opponents were treated. All in all, there were too many fight scenes with too many atrocities for me.

Speaker:
Erich Wittenberg is convincing. His lecture is calm, but still expressive. Each character has its own voice and is clearly recognizable. As a hearing driver, I am pleased that there are largely no very quiet spots. So I could fully enjoy the speaker's lecture. Five stars for the speaker are appropriate.

Conclusion:
I didn't like this book as much as its predecessor because there was just too much and too cruel fighting. That's why this time I'm only giving three out of five stars (60 out of 100 points).


Refers to the following edition: Audio CD