How many cities in the United States have baseball stadiums

MLB: Baseball stadiums - the combination of tradition and modernity

© imago images / Matthew Pearce

The Texas Rangers got a new home for the 2020 season. Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas became the youngest ball park in the Major Leagues. SPOX presents the new showpiece and the remaining 29 big league parks.

© imago images / Matthew Pearce

The groundbreaking ceremony for the new Globe Life Field took place in September 2017. The first event in the new stadium was a high school graduation at the end of May, as the MLB was interrupted due to Corona.

© imago images / Matthew Pearce

The area around the new ball park is also worth seeing with a fountain, fan shops, restaurants and of course statues. Probably the most important statue is that of Rangers legend and Nolan Ryan, who pitched 7 no-hitters in his career.

© imago images / Matthew Pearce

When spectators are allowed in again, Globe Life Field offers space for 40,300 fans. This makes it smaller than its predecessor, Globe Life Park in Arlington, which had space for 48,114 spectators.

© imago images / Matthew Pearce

The roof opens and the dimensions of the field are as follows: Left Field: 329 feet, Left Center: 372 feet, Center Field: 407 feet, Right Center: 374 feet, Right Field: 326 feet. The new home of the Rangers cost 1.1 billion dollars.

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The Atlanta Braves opened their new SunTrust Park for the 2017 season, and their first home game took place on April 14th

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The just over 41,000 spectators in Atlanta sit closer to the action than anywhere else. LED spotlights provide the necessary brightness, and there is also air conditioning in every grandstand due to the bad summer heat in Georgia

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Turner Field was the 1996 Olympic Stadium at the Atlanta Summer Games and was subsequently remodeled. After 20 years it has had its day as the home of the Braves. And where else is it being played?

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Angel Stadium of Anaheim: After some renovations, the home of the Angels now has a rocky landscape in the outfield. Whoever hits the ball there has a lot of power

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AT&T Park in San Francisco: The home of the San Francisco Giants since 2001 has already seen some highlights. Among other things, the record home run for Barry Bonds in 2007

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Iconic: Outside Right Field is McCovey Cove, named after legend Willie McCovey. If you hammer the ball into the water there, you'll land a "splash hit"

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Busch Stadium in St. Louis. The second stadium with that name. If the old stadium still had the Gateway Arch on the building, the gate to the west now adorns the background beyond Center Field

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Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore: Many call it the most modern traditional ball park because a lot is reminiscent of the good old days

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Behind the stands in Right Field you can see the warehouse on Eutaw Street. Very strong hitters hit a ball against it - or at least shortly before it

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Chase Field in Phoenix: In the middle of the Arizona desert, the Diamondbacks play in their stadium with a lockable roof. In spite of this, the lawn is nature

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Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati: The Cincinnati Reds play right on the edge of the Ohio River. And thanks to the design of the park, the balls literally fly out of the stadium

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It's traditional in Center Field: The two chimneys smoke when the Reds hit a home run. They are supposed to remind of the steamships of the Ohio River in the 19th century

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Citi Field in Flushing / New York: The New York Mets have been playing in their new ball park since 2009. The parking lot of the old Shea Stadium used to be located in the same place

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Citi Field is sprawling and is often referred to as "Petco East" - because home runs are hard to beat here. Therefore, the fences have already been moved closer to home plate twice

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Comerica Park in Detroit: The Tigers are betting on the region in their ball park - look for the Chevrolet logo or the Motor City skyline

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White tigers right at the entrance - and no, Siegfried and Roy have absolutely nothing to do with this!

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Coors Field in Denver: Yeah, am I standing in the woods? There are numerous trees to be found in Center Field; in Mile High City you are in touch with nature

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Otherwise, however, the Coors Field relies on modern technology such as the gigantic scoreboard. And the balls fly particularly far through the thin air

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Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles: One of the most iconic venues is the Ballpark in Chavez Ravine. 56,000 spectators go in here

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Dodger Stadium is also one of the few ball parks that are nearly symmetrical - both foul lines are 330 feet long and Center Field is 400 feet deep

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Fenway Park in Boston: Opened in 1912, Fenway is the MLB's oldest ball park. The special feature is the large green wall with display board in the Left Field: the "Green Monster"

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All of the major successes of the Boston Red Sox can be found above the stands behind home plate in the form of pennant signs

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Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City: The home of the 1986 and 2015 world champions, the Royals. In addition to the huge scoreboard with crown, it convinces with another special feature ...

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... the waterfalls and fountains in the outfield create a special ambience. However, viewers are not allowed to immerse themselves

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Marlins Park in Miami: The Miami Marlins have been playing in their new home with a lockable roof since 2012

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This monster can be found in Left-Center Field: a sculpture that moves when the marlins hit a home run. Not pretty, but rarely

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Miller Park in Milwaukee: The Brewers venue was one of the first MLB stadiums with a lockable roof.

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The daylight is optimally used as long as possible through the large windows in the outfield

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Minute Maid Park in Houston: In addition to the lockable roof, the Astros stadium has a railroad along the Left Field line. It is reminiscent of the old subway station below the ball park

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Nationals Park in Washington / DC: The home of the Nationals has been standing since 2008 and was inaugurated with a Sunday Night Game on ESPN. George W. Bush threw the ceremonial first pitch

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Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland: The venue, which is equally unloved by the Raiders and Athletics, has long been due to be replaced. But it is difficult to find alternatives

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PETCO Park in San Diego: A gigantic ball park where the All-Star Game took place in 2016. Home runs only beat real power hitters here

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The stadium is located in the middle of the city and part of the grandstand in Left Field is the old Western Metal Supply Building, which is a listed building

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Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia: The Phillies have been playing there since 2004 and twice reached the World Series during this time - in 2008 they even won the title here

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PNC Park in Pittsburgh: No matter who you ask, PNC Park is one of the most beautiful ball parks in the MLB. The background with the Roberto Clemente Bridge is particularly worth seeing

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Progressive Field in Cleveland: Formerly known as "Jacob's Field", the ball park was gradually shaped into a jewelry box

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Globe Life Park: The Rangers stadium has a "jet stream" due to its construction, ie a swath of air that allows many balls to fly far. Many homers are the result

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Rogers Center: The former "Sky Dome" is the only MLB stadium in Canada. Right next to the CN Tower, however, it doesn't necessarily impress with its artificial turf

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Safeco Field: Home runs are a rarity at the Seattle Mariners' stadium. It's a pitcher's paradise. In the left background you can also see the Seahawks' stadium

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Target Field in Minneapolis: The Minnesota Twins have been playing outdoors since 2010. Before that, they played their home games in the stuffy Metrodome

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Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago: The home of the White Sox, formerly known as Comiskey Park, is in southern Chicago

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Wrigley Field in Chicago: North Chicago is home to the Cubs. Wrigley has been standing since 1914 and has been waiting for a World Series since the "Curse of the Billy Goat" - in 2016 the time had finally come!

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Yankee Stadium in the Bronx / New York: The third version of the legendary Yankee Stadium has been in service since 2009. Right at the start there was the 27th title for the Bronx Bombers

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The outer facade is reminiscent of the very first Yankee Stadium from the 1920s, as is the relief within the arena below the roof