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Graphs & Networks

Graph Conference 2019: Academy of Sciences, Mainz and DHd-AG Graphentechnologien

Modeling, indexing, comparison: graphs in the digital humanities

on January 18 and 19, 2019 at the Academy of Sciences and Literature Mainz.

TitleSurnameTime
Friday, January 18th, 2019
WelcomeAndreas Kuczera13:15
Session 1: ModelingChair: Tara Andrews
1Identifying relevant patterns in a huge graph of open data. A semantic exploration of the Panama papersAntoine Vion13:30
2Palatinate castles and their surroundings in the Middle Ages, modeled using Neo4j, QGIS and 3D modelsAaron Pattee14:00
3ReGroup: The graph-based analysis of group representations in the Roman Empire and their importance for the production of art-scientific knowledgeKatharina Lorenz, Andreas Kuczera14:30
Coffee break15:00
Session 2: Analytical MethodsChair: Joris van Zundert
4From visual search results to networks of book illustrationsGermaine Götzelmann15:30
5Visualizing the Evolution of the Post-1989 Literary Life in Poland on the Basis of Bibliographical DataMaciej Maryl16:00
6The Occupations Browser: mediating text graphs in the service of social historyDavid Banks, Alex Butterworth16:30
Coffee break17:00
Session 3: ToolsChair: Thomas Efer
7TEI beyond XMLAndreas Kuczera, Stefan Armbruster, Iian Neill17:30
8Dating Mechanism: A linked data strategy for the interoperable and comprehensible modeling of relative chronologies using the example of South Gallic Terra Sigillata in Limes sectionsAllard Mees, Florian Thiery18:00
9Graph-based modeling of multilevel annotation in historical textsChristina Vertan18:30
Keynote: In the maze of formats or Is the better ‘Text as a Graph’ the enemy of the good XML ’?Prof. Dr. Thomas Stäcker19:00
Reception in the Academy20:00
Saturday, January 19th, 2019
Session 4: ModelingChair: Franziska Diehr
10Aristotle multimodal - With ediarum in the graphMartin Fechner, Andreas Kuczera9:00
11African Red Slip Ware as a graph: Modeling in CIDOC-CRM in the ARS3D projectAshish Karmacharya, Louise Rokohl, Florian Thiery9:30
12Representing the multimodal structure of diagrams using graphsTuomo Hiippala10:00
Coffee break10:30
Session 5: Approaches to Querying and AccessChair: Andreas Kuczera
13Collaboration graphsMichael Dürfeld, Anika Schultz, Christian Stein, Benjamin Thomack, Nadia Zeissig11:00
14Graph technologies for the study of "social reading." The case of WattpadSimone Rebora, Federico Pianzola11:30
15Graphs with GraphQL in TimbuctooMenzo Windhouwer, Martijn Maas, Jauco Noordzij12:00
16Stuttgart School NetworkClaus-Michael Schlesinger12:30
Final discussion13:00
End of Conference13:30

The Google Doc version of the conference program can be found here.

Introductory workshop neo4j (with 25 seats) on January 17 and 18, 2019 in the Academy of Sciences and Literature Mainz.

The workshop starts on January 17th. at 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. and runs on January 18. from 9 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. It takes place in the humanities class.

We thank the Academy of Sciences and Literature, Mainz and the Association DHd for supporting the conference.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us

[email protected] available.


Call for papers for the conference (english version see below)

PDF download: CfP_deCfP_en

Modeling, indexing, comparison: graphs in the digital humanities

on January 18 and 19, 2019 at the Academy of Sciences and Literature, Mainz

Graph databases have been used for several years in research projects to model research data and knowledge. As a result, we are now seeing widespread exploration of their potential in the humanities: graphs are used to describe social networks, correspondence networks, text variations, text traditions, prosopographical data, and more. to represent. They are increasingly complementing relational or XML-based research data repositories. Heterogeneous modeling approaches are pursued in the various application contexts. These different modeling approaches are to be presented and discussed at the conference as a first step towards a conceivable harmonization.

The aim of the conference is a wide range of possibilities for graph-based applications in the humanities to show. The focus is on the variety of modeling approaches and applications, while the possibility of generalizing data structures for different areas of application is to be investigated. The conference will therefore focus on both a variety of creative approaches and the identification of commonalities for the community-driven development of humanities graph models.

The planned conference is dedicated to the following key areas:

  1. Flexibility versus interoperability
    Graph structures make it possible to express highly specific data, information and interpretations. This facilitates research in the humanities, which is characterized by heterogeneous data, situated interpretation, complex research questions and project-specific ephemeral research design. At the same time, research institutions, data repositories, research infrastructures and digital archives require the standardization of data and the interoperability of tools in order to facilitate their sustainability and reuse. Do these two characteristics fundamentally contradict each other, or can they be different sides of the same coin?
  2. Generic structures
    The second focus follows immediately and deals with development structures in the graph. How could the simplest, generic structures possible, from which discipline-specific annotation systems can then be developed? What does a minimal, sustainable humanities-oriented generic graph data structure look like, and is it possible with such a structure to support the highly specific semantics that humanities research requires?
  3. Research strategies
    From the point of view of interoperability, comparative query strategies for different research data repositories are of the utmost importance. There are several graph-oriented query languages ​​(e.g. GraphQL, OpenCypher, Gremlin, SPARQL), but what requirements should be placed on a graph query language that is specifically geared to humanities research data and questions? What can such strategies look like? Are there opportunities to find cross-disciplinary approaches here?

The focus of the conference is on the exchange of application scenarios for graph technologies, not least to avoid duplicate developments, and on community building around graph technologies.

We particularly welcome suggestions for theoretical approaches that essentially deal with one of these key topics, as well as practice-oriented work that describes the practical application of graph technologies to research in the humanities on these topics or practical technical solutions and approaches to these key questions or related topics such as the Example:

  • Graph-based data models, theoretical and practical studies
  • Applications of graph technologies in the humanities
  • Text as graph (TAG)
  • Solutions for querying and comparing different graph models
  • Strategies for (computer-aided) access to humanities data and information in the form of graphs
  • Graph-based representation of specific networks of people, objects and information on issues related to the humanities
  • Interaction with graphs and graph interaction design
  • Graphs as a solution for information and data annotation in the humanities
  • Graphs as models to represent the provenance and transfer of information
  • Graphs as models for historical data and information that go beyond the analysis of social networks
  • Technical approaches to analyzing, traversing and querying graph-based data structures in specific humanities research contexts
  • Comparison and interpretation of graphs, subgraphs and graph traversals

Interested parties are asked to submit a short abstract in German or English (approx. 300 to max. 500 words, excluding literature references) up to and including October 15th, 2018 to [email protected] A notification of acceptance of the contribution will be made by November 25, 2018. The authors of the accepted contributions are asked to prepare a 20-minute presentation, which can be followed by a short discussion.

The Keynote holds Prof. Dr. Thomas Stäcker, Director of the Darmstadt State and University Library.

The organizers of the conference endeavor to finance travel expenses for the speakers for each accepted entry (one grant per entry).

Featured papers will be published online, however the Program Committee intends to publish selected papers in an appropriate peer-reviewed publication.

Program Committee:

Prof. Dr. Tara Andrews (Vienna)
Dr. Andreas Kuczera (Mainz / Giessen)
Dr. Thomas Efer (Leipzig)
Franziska Diehr (Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, Berlin)
Dr. Elena Spadini (University of Lausanne)
Drs. Joris van Zundert (Amsterdam)

(english version)

Graph Technologies in the Digital Humanities: Modeling, Access, Comparison

Call for papers for a two day international exploratory conference organized by the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz, January 18-19, 2019.

Although graph models as a computing technology are several decades old, it is only through advancement of generally available computing capacity in the last few years that the application of graph models has become feasible for many humanities projects. As a result we are now seeing a widespread exploration of their potential in the humanities: graphs are being used to express social networks, correspondence networks, text variation, textual traditions, prosopographical data, and so forth. Furthermore, they increasingly complement relational or XML-based research data repositories. The exploratory state of graph application in the humanities is marked by a great variety of modeling approaches and various understandings of graphs as data and information structures. These different modeling approaches are to be presented and discussed at the conference as a first step towards conceivable harmonization.

The purpose of this conference is to cast a wide net, soliciting contributions that represent the many applications that humanities researchers are currently finding for graphs. While keeping the rich variation in modeling approaches and applications in the foreground, we aim at the same time to explore the possibility of generalizing data structures for different application domains. The conference will thus focus both on celebrating a multitude of creative approaches and on identifying common ground for community-driven development of humanities-specific graph models.

Key topics of the conference include:

  1. Flexibility versus interoperability
    Graphs are versatile structures able to express highly specific data, information, and interpretation. This facilitates humanities research, marked as it is by heterogeneous data, situated interpretation, complex research questions, and project-specific ephemeral research design. At the same time research institutions, data repositories, research infrastructures, and digital archives require standardization of data and interoperability of tools to facilitate their sustainability and reuse. Are these two features fundamentally at odds with each other, or can they be different sides of the same coin?
  2. Generalization
    Closely related to the first key topic is the question of modeling in graph structures and possibilities of generalization. Can we define generic terms, concepts, and structures from which discipline-specific annotation systems can then be developed? What does a minimally-sustainable humanities-oriented generic graph data structure look like, and is it possible with such a structure to support the highly specific semantics required by most humanities research?
  3. Approaches to querying and access
    To support different research strategies it is paramount that interoperable research data repositories support adaptable query and information retrieval approaches. Several graph-oriented query languages ​​exist (e.g. GraphQL, OpenCypher, Gremlin, SPARQL), but what requirements should be set for a graph query language geared especially towards humanities research data and questions? What can such strategies look like? Are there opportunities to find interdisciplinary approaches here?

We welcome proposals for theoretical papers that engage substantially with any of these key topics, as well as for practice-based papers that describe the practical application of graph technologies to humanities research work to these topics and / or argue practical engineering solutions and approaches to these key questions or related topics such as:

  • Graph-based data models, theoretical and practical explorations
  • Applications of graph technologies in the humanities
  • Text-as-Graph (TAG)
  • Solutions for query and comparison of different graph models
  • Strategies for, or demonstration of, various kinds of (computational) access to humanities data and information represented as graphs
  • Graph representation of specific networks of persons, objects, and information relating to humanities research questions
  • Interacting with graphs and graph interaction design
  • Graphs as a solution for information and data annotation in the humanities
  • Graphs as models for representation of provenance and transmission of information
  • Graphs as models for historical data and information, above and beyond social network analysis
  • Engineering solutions to analysis, traversal, querying graph structure data in specific humanities research contexts
  • The comparison and interpretation of graphs, subgraphs, and traversals

Proposals (between 300 and 500 words, excluding bibliographic references) should be submitted to [email protected] by 15 October 2018. Abstracts may be submitted in English or German. Notification of acceptance or rejection will be sent out on 25 November 2018. Authors of successful submissions will be allotted 20 minutes for their presentations, as well as a few minutes for discussion thereafter.

A. keynote by Prof. Dr. Thomas Stäcker, Director of the State and University Library in Darmstadt, will be presented at the conference.

The organizers of the conference are seeking funding to support travel costs for the presenters of each accepted paper (one bursary per paper).

Presented papers will be published on line at the very least, however the program committee intends to publish selected papers in a suitable peer reviewed publication.

Program Committee:

Prof. Dr. Tara Andrews (University of Vienna)
Dr. Andreas Kuczera (Academy of Science and Literature, Mainz / Gießen)
Dr. Thomas Efer (University of Leipzig)
Franziska Diehr (Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, Berlin)
Dr. Elena Spadini (University of Lausanne)
Drs. Joris van Zundert (Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands, Amsterdam)